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Various - Martin Luther King’s Blues: African-American blues and gospel songs on MLK 1963-1968 mp3 album

  • Performer: Various
  • Title: Martin Luther King’s Blues: African-American blues and gospel songs on MLK 1963-1968
  • Genre: Blues
  • Formats: MP1 TTA DMF DXD APE AIFF AA
  • Released: 2010
  • MP3 album: 1874 mb
  • FLAC album: 1176 mb
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 316
Various - Martin Luther King’s Blues: African-American blues and gospel songs on MLK 1963-1968 mp3 album

VA - Martin Luther King's & Johnson's Blues 2009 VA - Martin Luther King's Blues 2009 04. The Hewlett Sisters - What Manner Of Man (W. 13. Robert Chatman - Ballad Of Martin Luther King, J. .14. The Norfleet Bros. We All Praise Hi. p3. 10. Ethel Davenport - Free At Last. 07. 'Little'' Mack Simmons - A Tribute To Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Stop Looting And Rioting). 11. Big Joe Williams - The Death Of Dr. Martin Luther King. 19. Bill Spivery And The Sons Of Truth - The Non-Violent Ma. 18. Shirley Wahls - We've Got To Keep On Moving O. 21. Thomas Walton & The Blind Disciples - Ode To Martin Luther King. 15. The Southerners - Tragic Story (A Tribute To Rev.

I Have a Dream" is a public speech that was delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States. Delivered to over 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, . the speech was a defining moment of the civil rights movement and among the most iconic speeches in American history.

On 4 April 1968, the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr, who was shot while standing on a balcony outside his second-floor room at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, stunned the world. The man who had led the civil-rights movement for more than a decade had a huge influence on musicians. King himself was a fan of jazz and gospel. The wonderful singer Mahalia Jackson sang ‘Precious Lord, Take My Hand’ at his funeral, because it was the last song he requested before his death. In particular, King was a big fan of bebop. On the day after King’s assassination, the blues pianist, a member of Muddy Waters’ band, performed two newly composed blues for the fallen civil-rights leader: ‘Blues For Martin Luther King’ and ‘Hotel Lorraine’. Marvin Gaye: ‘Abraham, Martin And John’ (1968).

King’s last public speech foreshadowed his death. On the night before his assassination, MLK came to Memphis to give a speech in support of the city’s African-American garbage workers.

Georgia Blues & Gospel 1927-1931. Released in 1993 and reissued in 2005, Document's Georgia Blues & Gospel 1927-1931 is a warmly rewarding collection of old-styled African-American music from the East Coast, mostly recorded in the state of Georgia during the years 1927-1931 by three old-style bluesmen and one barrelhouse blues woman.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day (officially Birthday of Martin Luther King, J. and sometimes referred to as MLK Day) is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around King's birthday, January 15. The holiday is similar to holidays set under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act. The earliest Monday for this holiday is January 15 and the latest is January 21.

African American Gospel music is a form of euphoric, rhythmic, spiritual music rooted in the solo and responsive church singing of the African American South. Its development coincided with - and is germane to - the development of rhythm and blues. African American Gospel. African American Gospel music is a form of euphoric, rhythmic, spiritual music rooted in the solo and responsive church singing of the African American South. Five recordings from Library of Congress collections.

The blues has deep roots in American history, particularly African-American history. The blues originated on Southern plantations in the 19th Century. It's generally accepted that the music evolved from African spirituals, African chants, work songs, field hollers, rural fife and drum music, revivalist hymns, and country dance music. The blues grew up in the Mississippi Delta just upriver from New Orleans, the birthplace of jazz. Many of the earliest blues musicians incorporated the blues into a wider repertoire that included traditional folk songs, vaudeville music, and minstrel tunes. Without getting too technical, most blues music is comprised of 12 bars (or measures). A specific series of notes is also utilized in the blues.

Tracklist

1 Brother Will Hairston The Alabama Bus (Parts &1&2)
2 Bob Starr The Jail House King
3 Johnie Lewis I Got To Climb A High Mountain
4 The Hewlett Sisters What Manner Of Man (Was Dr. Martin Luther King) (Parts 1&2)
5 Otis Spann Hotel Lorraine
6 Rev. Julius Cheeks* & The Four Knights Where Do I Go From Here
7 Little Mac Simmons* A Tribute To Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (Stop Looting And Rioting)
8 Big Maybelle Heaven Will Welcome You Dr. King
9 The Loving Sisters Tribute To Dr. King
10 Ethel Davenport Free At Last
11 Big Joe Williams The Death Of Dr. Martin Luther King
12 Tom Shaw Martin Luther King
13 Robert Chatman Ballad Of Martin Luther King, Jr.
14 The Norfleet Bros.* We All Praise Him
15 The Southerners Tragic Story (A Tribute To Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.)
16 Nina Simone Why (The King Of Love Is Dead)
17 Earl Gaines Our Friend Is Gone
18 Shirley Wahls We've Got To Keep On Movin' On
19 Bill Spivery & The Sons Of Truth The Non-Violent Man
20 Rev. Charlie Jackson* Something To Think About
21 Thomas Walton & The Blind Disciples Ode To Martin Luther King
22 Elizabeth D. Williams Sleep On Doctor King, Sleep On


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